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Zone Fighter (1973) | Episodes 6 through 10

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Zone Fighter Episodes 6-10

Episode 06: KING GHIDORAH’S COUNTERATTACK!
Japanese Title: Kingugidora-no Gyakushuu!
Original Airdate: 7:00pm (JST) Monday May 7th 1973
Director: Jun Fukuda
Director of Special FX: Teruyoshi Nakano
Writer: Juro Shimamoto & Akira Ishikari

Episode 07: ZONE FAMILY’S CRITICAL MOMENT!
Japanese Title: Zoonfamirii Kikiippatsu!
Original Airdate: 7:00pm (JST) Monday May 14th 1973
Director: Kengo Furusawa
Director of Special FX: Teruyoshi Nakano
Writer: Satoshi Kurumi

Episode 08: DEFEAT THE INVADER OF FEAR!
Japanese Title: Taose! Kyoufu-no Inbeedaa
Original Airdate: 7:00pm (JST) Monday May 21st 1973
Director: Akiyasu Kikuchi
Director of Special FX: Koichi Kawakita
Writer: Satoshi Kurumi

Episode 09: FIND THE SECRET OF THE RED SPIDER!
Japanese Title: Oe! Reddosupaidaa-no Himitsu
Original Airdate: 7:00pm (JST) Monday May 28th 1973
Director: Kengo Furusawa
Director of Special FX: Teruyoshi Nakano
Writer: Juro Shimamoto

Episode 10: ZONE FIGHTER, DESTROYED!
Japanese Title: Zettaizetsumei! Zoonfaitaa
Original Airdate: 7:00pm (JST) Monday June 4th 1973
Director: Akiyasu Kikuchi
Director of Special FX: Koichi Kawakita
Writer: Motoo Nagai

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2 thoughts on “Zone Fighter (1973) | Episodes 6 through 10

  1. Ayame says:

    If Mr. Joe wants a couple more Japanese epic, I would submit 1958’s “Nichiren to mōko daishūrai” (Nichiren And The Great Mongol Invasion] (about five minutes short of 2 1/2 hours, but close enough…the founder of Nichiren Buddhism and the 1274 & 1281 Mongol Invasions of Japan) and 1961’s “Shaka” (Buddha)(the historical Buddha). There are lots of others, but these are in the ’10 Commandments’ vein.

    As to Shinto, here is a very short and general version. Up until about 1870 it was largely just an informal gathering of folk tales and traditions that coexisted and flourished with Buddhism. Very nativistic, with spirits (kami) residing in most everything. It became more formal when Imperial Japan co-opted it into ‘State Shinto’ and made it the official religion of the land. These days it is back to coexisting with Buddhism, with most Buddhist temples having one or more Shinto shrines on their grounds. About 99% of Japanese identify as Shinto-Buddhist (both), although neither are practiced on a regular basis very much. Mostly on New Year’s, festivals, and births for Shinto, funerals and festivals for Buddhism. They are really more of a philosophy/way of life than a religion in Japan. Of Shinto in particular it is said “no one believes in Shinto, but everyone reveres it”-teaching respect for nature in a country with very limited natural resources.

    1. Drew Daybell says:

      Your comments are the best, thank you very much have Ayame for the wonderful insight.

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